The Missing iSync in OS X Lion (and what to do about it)

The short answer to someone looking for a solution: just copy over iSync from your Snow Leopard installation back to the /Applications folder in Lion, and also copy the phone plugin you need back into /Library/PhonePlugins folder. Everything will be as it was. Enjoy.

The longer story requires more explanation …

The Problem

I have been looking forward to upgrading to the latest version of OSX (Lion) ever since the announcements were made in the WWDC earlier this year.

However, in the middle of the whole slew of new functions and features (“250+”), Lion is also leaving behind a few things – notably Rosetta (the PowerPC translation layer) – and the iSync and FrontRow applications.

The demise of PowerPC emulation has been long in coming, and was not really a surprise, given that it has been 6 years since Intel became the official CPU for Apple machines. The main impact really seems to be for Quicken users, which might actually be a blessing in disguise, given how pathetic Quicken really was on the Mac.
isync-2011-07-21-23-25.png
iSync has been removed presumably because it has been one of the “low usage” applications on the platform. iTunes is the center of most of the Mac based synchronization these days, along with MobileMe for the cloud side of things.

However, iSync has been a key feature of the OS for me, as I carry a non-iOS phone (a Nokia E71 actually), and being able to seamlessly synchronize my contacts and calendars with the phone using iSync made it a key part of my workflow (I even have some Automator scripts to make this easier). And iSync has been able to synchronize over Bluetooth, unlike the tethered experience with the iOS devices so far (though OTA sync is on the way with iOS 5 later this fall).

Alas, OS X Lion removes the iSync application from the hard disk once it is installed, and for a time I thought that this was end of the line for the convenience I had with the E71, and would need to go back to the darks days of manual data entry for the addresses (manual entry of calendar entries is too much of a hassle on the phone, and would need to be dropped all together).

The Solution

Before installation of Lion, I had taken a full disk image of my previous Snow Leopard installation using the excellent SuperDuper! Disk cloner.

This was more from a backup and recovery perspective, but allowed me an unexpected solution to the iSync quandary – on a whim, I attached the Snow Leopard disk to the Mac running Lion, and clicked on the iSync application. Voila! iSync works exactly as it should!

In hindsight, this is not really surprising, since iSync really has been a front end for the underlying sync services (which are still around in Lion), and for managing phone and device specific plugins.

All that was needed was to just copy over iSync back into the “/Applications” folder, and also copy the phone plugins (just one in my case) to the “/Library/PhonePlugins” folder.

phoneplugins-2011-07-21-23-25.png

In summary, while Apple in its immense wisdom took out a feature that was useful to some (albeit a minority), getting it to work again was surprisingly easy. Will need to check out the situation with FrontRow next time.

[Update on July 22, 2011]

Looks like a similar recovery process exists for FrontRow as well.  See this article at Macworld.


How I Learned to stop using Firefox and love the Chrome

One word: SPEED.

Seriously. I have been a long proponent and user of Firefox, having been lured into it by its relative elegance and the extension framework many moons back. Also, the web development support has always been far better than its competition, with Firebug and Web Developer to name just two great reasons for it being the developer’s browser of choice.

firefoxbrowserfreewaystocustomizeyourinternet1.png

The sheer number of Firefox add-ons and extensions (about 13,000 in the last count) is staggering – and list absolute essentials such as Adblock Plus, XMarks and DownThemAll! This combined with the themes (I suggest GrApple Yummy on the Mac) has been making the web browsing experience a far better one for me than Safari.

But the problem with Firefox is … it is SLOW.

With just seven add-ons (Adblock Plus, XMarks, DownThemAll!, 1Password, LastPass, FlashBlock and Firefox PDF Plugin for Mac OS X) it takes about 3-4 seconds to launch the application opening a blank home page on an OS X 10.6.3 MacBook. Another 2-3 seconds before any reasonable page is fully rendered. This becomes excruciatingly slow when I am busily opening tabs from a RSS reader or another application – and frustrating when it has to launch the first time I click on a link in another application.

Also, while a custom theme does look pretty – it sometimes does expose artifacts in the chrome (no pun intended) when rendering new pages – especially in the “awesome bar”.

All in all, while the experience is nice, it certainly is not perfect. Speed of launch and rendering are the main gripes.

googlechrome-getafastnewbrowser-forpcmacandlinux.png

I have been toying with Google Chrome ever since the beta for OS X came out. I was initially put off by the inverted tabs as well as lack of extensions (hey, a 21st century browser with no extensions, come on!) Also, the single URL bar/search bar UI seemed … odd. So while the beta version did stay on the HDD, it did not see much use, and Firefox remained the work horse for daily use.

However, with the recent launch of the stable OS X version, I became interested again. And this time Chrome did have a pretty mature extensions ecosystem, some of which seemed to be reasonable replacements for the Firefox equivalents. Time for a spin!

The first thing which struck me was the speed of launch as well as page renders, and the UI feels much more “fluid”. The Inverted tabs still look odd and out of place, but I understand the need to squeeze the additional 20-30 pixels for actual page use.

Actual page rendering in terms of quality is more or less at par with Firefox, though a few oddball sites (especially the work related sites) sometimes get weird effects. I blame it on the IE centric development though. :-)

The unified bar is also starting to make sense, as it actually helps in not having to remember one extra key short cut for searching. It has good support for Firefox like keyword searches as well (example, ‘wk’ for Wikipedia searches) provided you set them up.

I also found more or less feature equivalent extensions:

Xmarks is available for Chrome
Lastpass is available for Chrome
AdThwart in replacement of AdBlock Plus

I found that FlashBlock does exist for Chrome, but I don’t really need it anymore.

The one big hole in the extensions/add-on replacement is DownThem All! There are quite a few download managers, but none can match the Firefox one in terms of features (I am still looking).

The extension manager is also pretty nice, and arguably better than the Firefox one (at least for FF 3.6.3). However, the actual extensions gallery on Google is not quite as user friendly as the Firefox one. The extensions are not categorized completely, which makes it somewhat of a pain to search and find the right one.

extensions1.png

All in all, the Chrome experience has been a refreshing one so far, and Firefox has not seen much use of late – except where I needed to use DownThem All! (simultaneously downloading all chapters of the free audiobooks from www.librivox.org is one example). If anyone has recommendation for a good replacement, let me know.

So there you have it. My infatuation with Chrome has already lasted more than a week, and I still find it a pleasure to use. Have not really dabbled much with the extensions (and themes – Chrome does have support for these as well) – but am finding that I don’t really need to.


Converting from TaskPaper to Emacs Org-Mode

Why TaskPaper and Org-Mode?

TaskPaper is a simple and elegant task management software for the OSX platform. It combines the simplicity of a text micro-format to mark the tasks, and the elegance of a Mac UI. It also provides a quick launch time and a nice system-wide quick entry window that is accessible with a single shortcut key.

tasks.png

taskpapercapturewindow.png

I have been a heavy user of Emacs’ Org-Mode for some years now, and love the power and flexibility it offers for tracking not just outlines and tasks, but any text based item, including notes and calendar entries. In fact Org-Mode has become one of the primary software that I use regularly, every day.

So where does the link between TaskPaper and Org-Mode come in? Both are text based, and have their own light-weight formats to define outlines and tasks. The underlying files are plain text with the meaning readable even when not viewed by the appropriate software. Org-Mode is obviously much more feature rich than TaskPaper, which by design keeps things simple.

However, there is one big difference that has led me to looking at integration: Org-Mode is Emacs based and hence takes ages to launch. TaskPaper on the other hand launches in under a second, and also offers a nice quick entry form that is available system-wide via a a global short-cut key.

Emacs aficionados will protest now – after all – Emacs is meant to be launched and never shutdown! This is true, but in my usage patterns, Emacs does get closed once in a while and having to launch it just to make a few quick Org-Mode entries (even with the excellent remember mode) becomes a pain.

My usage has now become more of the following:

  1. Use TaskPaper as an initial capture mechanism (sort of as a pre-Inbox store). I make heavy use of the quick entry window here
  2. Use a script to collect the TaskPaper entries and reformat them into a Org-Mode compatible file
  3. Append the converted entries into my primary Org-Mode Inbox whenever I have Emacs open

This (for me) provides best of both worlds – quick and ubiquitous data capture, and the power and flexibility of Org-Mode.

The Ruby Conversion Script

Without further ado, the script to convert from TaskPaper to Org-mode is:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
#
# Converts Taskpaper files to Emacs org-mode files.
#
# Author: Anupam Sengupta, 2010
#
# Distributed under the BSD license (<a href="http://www.opensource.org/licenses/bsd-license.php">http://www.opensource.org/licenses/bsd-license.php</a>)
#
# Usage: From the command line, enter the command:
#
#  ./tpaper2org.rb &lt;taskpaperfilename&gt;
#
# The output is on STDOUT, which can be redirected to an Org-mode file.
# Whether the generated org-mode file should use odd-level prefix stars
# See <a href="http://orgmode.org/manual/Clean-view.html">http://orgmode.org/manual/Clean-view.html</a> for details.
ORG_USES_ODD_LEVELS = false

LINE_PATTERN = /^(\t*)          # Leading tabs
               -                # Followed by a dash (the taskpaper task identifier)
               (.*?)            # The task description
               ((@\w+\s*)*)     # The tags, if any
               $/x

all_tags = Hash.new(0)

Shiftlvl = ORG_USES_ODD_LEVELS ? 2 : 1 # Determine the number of stars to use in Org-mode entries

while (line = gets()):
  line.chomp!
   md = LINE_PATTERN.match(line)          # Match and extract each line
  if md then                                                # ................ A Task line
    tags = md[3].split(/ +/).reject {|tag| “@done” == tag } # get the tags, except @done tags
    tags = [‘’, tags, ‘’].flatten unless tags.empty?
    puts ‘*’ * (1 + Shiftlvl * (md[1].length + 1)) + (line =~ /@done/ ? “ DONE” : “ TODO”) + md[2] + tags.join(‘:’)
    tags.each { |tag| all_tags[tag] += 1} if tags # Keep a list of all tags
  elsif line =~/:$/                               # ................ A project line
    print “* “
    puts line.chomp(“:”)
  else                          # ................ Any other line
    puts line
  end
end

# Lets do a summary of the tags used.
puts &lt;&lt;END
# The tags used till now.
#+TAGS:#{all_tags.keys.sort.join(‘ ‘)}
END

Note that Org-mode supports multiple prefix styles with ‘*’. In particular, the odd-levels versus the odd-even levels is interesting and useful. The script has a ‘ORG_USES_ODD_LEVELS’ global variable that can be set to true if this is the desired export format.

In addition, the script also adds the tags used in the TaskPaper file as a ‘#+TAGS’ entry in the exported org-mode file. You can comment this if this is not required.

The TaskPaper format

The TaskPaper format is simple, and the file (which by default ends with the extension ‘.taskpaper’) is essentially a plain text file that can be opened and edited in any text editor.

The format can be summarized as (from the TaskPaper User’s Guide):

A project is a line ending with a colon:

      A Project:

A task is a line starting with a dash followed by a space:

    - My First Task

A Note is any line that is NOT a project or a task (i.e., does not start with a dash or end with a colon):

    Notes for a task

A tag is any word prefixed with the @ symbol. The tag can optionally have a value in parentheses after the tag name:

      - My First Task @atag @another_tag(1)

Outlining is done by indenting the tasks with tabs:

     - My First Task @atag
         - My sub-level task

Usage

Using the script is simple. Assuming that TaskPaper’s file is named tasks.taskpaper, from the OS X terminal, run the following command:

        $ tpaper2org.rb tasks.taskpaper >> tinbox.org

Where tinbox.org is the destination org-mode file.

This shell command can be put into a cron job or invoked from within Emacs to pull in the tasks as required. You may also want to delete the TaskPaper file (or empty its contents) after this is done, to prevent duplicate entries being imported the next time the Ruby Script is run.

Links

taskpaper.el is an Emacs mode for emulating the TaskPaper interface with support for projects and tasks. The tags support seems to be missing.

Discussion on the Org-Mode mailing list about Taskpaper and Org-Mode.


Firefox 3.6 finally allows true Fullscreen mode on Mac OSX

Updated to Firefox 3.6 today. As usual, a very solid update, and was pleasantly surprised by the full-screen mode (finally!) that works exactly as you would want it. This was one of the few areas where Firefox on OSX was lagging behind as compared to other platforms.

There were a few plugins that claimed to enable this in prior versions, but never worked very well.

The option is available under the “View”menu and has a standard Apple-Shift-F shortcut as well.

firefox1.png


Using M-` from switching Emacs Frames on OSX

The standard Emacs key-binding for moving to the other frame (‘other-frame’) is C-x 5 o. That’s quite a few key-strokes, and also does not match with the standard OS X key-mapping for switching windows, which is Command-`. On OS X, the Command key maps to Meta in Emacs.

However, this is easy to fix. Put the following code-fragment into your .emacs file:

(define-key icicle-mode-map [?\M-`] nil) # Only needed if you use Icicles
 (global-set-key [?\M-`] 'other-frame) # This sets the key binding

Note that by default M-` invokes ‘tmm-menubar’ which can also be accessed via [F10]. Also, you do not need the first line (to undefine the key binding in Icicles) if you do not use that package.


Emulate a three button Mouse in Emacs on a single button Mac trackpad/mouse

Traditionally, mice on Macs have had just one button (including the iBook/Powerbook trackpads) – even through Mac OS (including OS X) can accept 2 or 3 button input without any problems.

Emacs on the other hand maps quite a few functions to the second and third chords of the mice. If you want to emulate a three button mouse in Emacs on OS X, a simple customization option will do the trick.

Invoke:

M-x customize-group and enter mac. Navigate to the “Mac Emulate Three Button Mouse” and select option 2 or option 3. Voila!

Note: This works for Carbon Emacs – the customization group is not available on the latest 23.1 Cocoa Emacs.


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